Lighthouse Writers Workshop Podcast Podcasts from Lighthouse Writers Workshop, Colorado’s leading independent creative writing center.

December 17, 2014  

Rebecca Makkai is a Chicago-based writer whose recently released second novel, The Hundred-Year House, was called "a juicy and moving story of art and love and the luck it takes for either to last" by the Los Angeles Times. During her Fly-By Writer's weekend at Lighthouse, Rebecca read excerpts from The Hundred-Year House to a rapt crowd in the intimate setting of 1515 Race's 1st Floor Parlor.

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December 17, 2014  

The fifth annual The Story of a Book, an event where several Lighthouse faculty and their forthcoming books are celebrated, featured Benjamin Whitmer, Cry Father, Seth Brady Tucker We Deserve the Gods We Ask For, Thomas McNeely, Ghost Horse, and Michael Henry, Active Gods. We heard the ins and outs of the process these authors enjoyed (or endured) in getting their manuscripts from crazy first idea and into actual print. Each panelist read a short passage from his book and told the story of how it all came about. An audience Q&A and book signing rounded off this fun evening.

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December 17, 2014  

The Draft Reading Series celebrates the diverse and talented writing in our workshops that hovers around a given theme. They happen once per eight-week session--every winter, spring, late summer, and fall. Writers in workshops are drafted by instructors and sent to the front lines to read their work.

The theme of the October 2015 Draft is "Abductions" and the Draftees are:

  • Barbara Cocks, works in progress
  • Gemma Webster, novel
  • Kewanna Cigales, intermediate short story
  • Shelby Kinney-Lang, advanced short story
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October 7, 2014  

The Alice Maxine Bowie Fellowship sponsors a member of the Lighthouse writing community to a full year of literary support and involvement at Lighthouse. This fellowship was formed in honor of the great Alice Maxine Bowie, who believes everyone has a right to a meaningful education, that much of our most meaningful education comes from literature, and that the world benefits from hearing stories. The fellowship includes: Four 8-week workshops per year or master classes (one per year), as well as registration, lodging, and board for the Grand Lake Retreat or an all-access pass to the Lighthouse Lit Fest. Poet, Kim O'Connor was the recipient of the 2013-2014 Alice Maxine Bowie Fellowship. Kim’s fellowship culminated with a public reading and celebration on October 4, 2014, during which she was properly feted and shared the fruits of the project she has worked on over the course of the year with an appreciative crowd in the Lighthouse Grotto.

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October 7, 2014  

Inside the Writer's Studio is the popular and unpredictable on-stage, unscripted conversation between studio guest George Saunders and Lighthouse Fiction Instructor Nick Arvin. Gossip could be leaked. Craft secrets uncovered. Saunders was recently awarded The Story Prize and The Folio Prize for his collection of short stories, Tenth of December. He's also been a finalist for The Story Prize in the past for his collection In Persuasion Nation and was a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Award with CivilWarLand in Bad Decline. Saunders has also written screenplays, an illustrated fable, a book of essays, and a New York Times bestselling children's book. He writes for The New Yorker and GQ, and his work has appeared in Best American Short Stories and a number of other anthologies. In 2006, he was awarded both a Guggenheim Fellowship and a MacArthur Fellowship, and has taught at Syracuse University since 1996.

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October 7, 2014  

Matthew Thomas read from his novel We Are Not Ourselves to a packed crowd in the Lighthouse Grotto. The debut author charmed us with his charisma and a behind-the-curtain look of how his novel came to be.

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August 6, 2014  

The Literary salon has been a tradition at Lit Fest, featuring three or more speakers with varying perspectives on a theme, along with audience participation.
Balancing writing against any other aspect of life—your day job, spending time with friends, eating, sleeping—is always a difficulty, so how on earth do writers decide whether or not to have children? If they do how do they continue to write? When does it make sense not to? Listen in as Jenny Shank, Amanda Rea, and Nicky Beer have a respectful, wide-ranging discussion about how they faced this choice.

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August 5, 2014  

The Literary salon has been a tradition at Lit Fest, featuring three or more speakers with varying perspectives on a theme, along with audience participation.
In this salon ‘You Can’t Handle the Truth! Fiction vs. Nonfiction Smack-Down,’ nonfiction guru Richard Froude squares off against fictionista Joanna Ruocco in this smack down between two opposing (or are they?) forces. They talk about how truth finds its way into our work as writers of both fiction and nonfiction, and whether one genre actually does a better job of transmitting it—whatever the truth may be.

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August 5, 2014  

The Literary salon has been a tradition at Lit Fest, featuring three or more speakers with varying perspectives on a theme, along with audience participation.
In the salon ‘Au Naturel: Finding the Provocative, the Deep, the Wild, in Writing About Nature,’ Julene Bair, Gail Storey, and David Rothman, share their difficulties and triumphs making seamless (or at least well-stitched) transitions between what’s “out there” and “in here,” and discuss how, at its best, this meeting of forms breaks the confines and enlarges the territory of both.

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August 5, 2014  

The Literary salon has been a tradition at Lit Fest, featuring three or more speakers with varying perspectives on a theme, along with audience participation.
In an article published by the New York Times, reviewer Paul Elie called religious belief in contemporary fiction “something between a dead language and a hangover.” This salon explores the place religion holds in contemporary literature, if it holds any place at all. Can fiction still address questions of faith? Do we want it to? Listen in as Nick Arvin, Phyllis Barber, and Adam Rovner discuss these questions and many more.

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